Tag Archives: mexico

Laboratoria changes women’s lives through coding

“If you want to be a social entrepreneur, make sure you are aligned with something you’re really passionate about. It is the hardest thing I have ever done, but also the most gratifying.”

Gabriela Rocha believes in the power of code to change lives. While at Columbia University acquiring a Masters of Public Administration in Development Practice, Gabi met the future founders of an incredible social enterprise. Mariana Costa Checa, Herman Marin, and Rodulfo Prieto were bound by a common frustration with Latin America’s underdevelopment, all hoping to apply their careers to the improvement of the region. Upon graduating, however, they went their separate ways.

While Gabi went to the favelas of Rio on a project for the Inter-American Development Bank, the three founders journeyed back to Peru and started their first web design company. But when the time came to look for web developers, they encountered an unexpected obstacle. Developers were few and far between, and those they did find were overwhelmingly men. What’s more, they learned that most of their developers had never received a university degree in computer science, and instead had either taken short-term classes or been self-taught.

Mariana realized that there was a tremendous opportunity presenting itself. In a world where demand for web developers is growing, its members unimpeded by the need for university degrees, there was an ideal niche for women to leave the low-skilled, low-pay trap. And thus, the concept for Laboratoria was born. After a successful pilot in Peru, they contacted their former classmates, Gabi and Marisol, who launched branches in Mexico and Chile, respectively.

Since then, Laboratoria has quickly become a transformative, educational powerhouse. It identifies high potential women from low-income sectors of society and puts them through an intensive six-month program. The women are trained in web development as well as personal development, learning both the hard and soft skills necessary to acquire and retain a higher-skilled, better-paying job. To date, it has graduated over 400 students and boast a 75% job placement rate into employment averaging three times their previous income. It has thus effectively and spectacularly broken the cycle of poverty for hundreds of women and their families. Above all, it has proven to the world that poorly educated women working low-income jobs are able to learn coding and begin successful careers in the burgeoning and competitive tech industry.

Hoping to accelerate their already impressive growth, the Laboratoria team applied to Agora’s flagship Accelerator program in 2017. Through the exercises at the retreat and months with a dedicated consultant, they gained access to Agora’s Latin American network, engaging with both social entrepreneurs transforming the region and potential donors interested in their project. They came out of the Accelerator with the certainty that they would officially remain a non-profit organization, and the knowledge that they needed to extend the duration of their program to two years.

Laboratoria’s team today remains unequivocally dedicated to excellence. They hope to train 10,000 developers and be in fifteen cities across Latin America by 2020. Their success is demonstrated by stunning growth in a region hostile to fledgling enterprises, and their commitment to their mission has enabled them to remain focused on their impact and constantly adapt.

Gabi believes in the potential of social entrepreneurship to change the Latin American region. Despite being the hardest thing she’s ever done, she believes that it has also unquestionably been the most gratifying and exciting. She has finally aligned her passion with her work, and has the opportunity to find inspiration everyday in the transformations of Laboratoria’s incredible students. Being of service to a group of women so breathtakingly determined and resilient, who constantly defy stereotypes, expectations, and systemic obstacles, makes the many challenges completely worth it.

With Laboratoria, Gabi and her partners are expanding the notion of what a nonprofit is and can be in Latin America. Run on the honesty, humility, and integrity of its team, the organization is changing the world, one line of code at a time.

Learn more about Laboratoria at http://laboratoria.la

Promesa teaches students to value the environment

“My relationship with the consultant was the best part of the program; I felt comfortable enough to share every detail with him and he helped us to both restructure our program and strengthen our team.”

Julio Alvarez believes in the promise of an educational program to raise the environmental consciousness of a nation. While still a university student, Julio traveled often to Mexico’s beautiful Acapulco beach on family vacations. However, he was appalled by the apathy people had toward the environment. Visitors littered all over the sands, and the evening tide brought in plastic bags, diapers, and empty bottles. His frustration moved him to action; he started an organization that prompted beachfront restaurants to pay for the installation of trash bins, yet, 200 bins later, people still did not seem to care.

Julio was driven to do more. Over the next few years, he created environmental initiatives, green reports, reforestation programs, ecological holiday agendas, and environmental workshops for 26 companies. Again, however, the same stubborn apathy reared its ugly head. Realizing how difficult it was to change an adult’s mind about living a more sustainable life, Julio knew he had to craft a quality environmental education program targeted at youth. Thus was born the concept for Promesa.

Julio gathered a group of psychologists, biologists, and environmental engineers, who together formulated a K-12 program that not only involves every student, but also includes important milestones to measure progress. As an additional bonus, he structured the model so that it is completely self-sustainable by collecting and selling the recycling from the enrolled schools. Schools can therefore enroll in the program free of charge. Moreover, the ripple effect of this environmental initiative reaches beyond the students, touching their teachers, families, and administrators.

The results were stunning. Post-program surveys revealed steadily increasing numbers of students who recycle, and a partnered school has already developed a compost zone, vertical gardens, and pluvial water collection, with plans to install solar panels.

Julio was ready to scale. He applied to Agora’s Accelerator, looking to gain valuable consulting on how best to expand his company. With access to a network of successful social entrepreneurs, a consultant whose hands-on approach showed him his full potential for growth, and an experience at SOCAP where he was confident enough to ask for larger investments than ever before, Julio’s ambition was fully unleashed. He emerged from the Accelerator program with a stronger financial model that could be pitched to international investors, a clearer idea of the team he needed to scale his company, and a more solid communication strategy that allowed him to successfully secure investments six months later.

Promesa is now on the fast track. With an astonishing 100% retention rate of enrolled schools and a rapidly expanding team, Julio hopes to reach 250 schools in the next two months, 1000 schools by 2018, and 7000 schools by 2022. He is building connections across Mexico and the U.S., joining with foundations and associations to champion his environmental cause.

Julio wants to share his passion with everyone, believing that the program is the key to awakening the environmental consciousness of its many students. Promesa is fueled by the passion of its incredible team, and it is changing the world, one school at a time.

Learn more about Promesa at www.grupopromesa.com.

Indigo Impacto ensures access to safe drinking water

“As a social entrepreneur, you need to spend time on understanding the community you are impacting. You have to understand that market, and thoroughly understand their individual needs in order to best be able to help them.”

Israel Amezcua believes in the basic right of humans to access clean, affordable water. Throughout his life, Israel has always cultivated his natural entrepreneurial spirit, founding several ventures that sold products ranging from jewelry to organic coffee. But for the last decade, he dedicated his time to a civil association, working with safe water, management of natural resources, and rural development. Israel became increasingly drawn to the monumental importance and rising value of water. Faced with the quickly approaching effects of global warming, he knew that rural communities were most at risk and least capable of accessing clean, safe water.

Israel learned that, despite being one of the world’s largest consumers of freshwater per capita, Mexico still had over 20 million of its citizens living without access to clean water. This was causing a massive portion of the population to be extremely vulnerable to serious gastrointestinal diseases. Israel knew that something had to be done, and accordingly put his entrepreneurial spirit to work.

Working with Fermín, a friend from the same civil association, the two men decided that they wanted to empower these rural communities in the management of their own natural resource while simultaneously bringing them access to safe drinking water. Out of this idea, Indigo Impacto was born.

Conceived with a clear focus on these rural communities, Indigo Impacto builds on the existence of water purification kiosks in urban areas, adapting the models to more remote areas and using them to bring opportunity and autonomy to marginalized individuals. By selling the kiosk franchise for women to operate on their own, Indigo Impacto ensures a stable stream of income for individuals who were unlikely to ever own their own business. Additionally, the kiosks keep the price of safe water low and affordable for all of the community. They have even become a source of pride, proof that natural resources are being efficiently managed.

In addition to the purification kiosk franchise, Indigo Impacto sells simple systems that collect and purify rainwater for individual households. With these diverse services, Israel and Fermín are changing lives. Maricela, a resident of the rural Francisco Sarabia community in Chiapas, is a single mother who used to make a living cleaning houses. Introduced to the purification kiosks, she formed a group with four other women, installed a model, and began to run her brand new business. She now makes an income stable enough for her to spend time at home with her children and address their daily needs.

Inspired by Agora’s Latin American vision and focus, Israel applied to the Accelerator program in 2017. In the months that followed the initial retreat, Israel was guided by an invaluable consultant, readily available for support and consistently connecting him with new individuals and organizations that could push his business further. Indigo Impacto today is stronger than ever before, with a clearer pitch, message, and mission that have drawn in several interested investors.

Despite the rapid expansion of his company, Israel’s thirst for creating impact has not been quenched. He envisions Indigo Impacto operating in ten states throughout Mexico, installing between 300 and 500 kiosks to be operated by women, and selling 100,000 household purification systems. Israel runs his company driven by the need to create a better future for his family, and he is changing the world, one drop of clean water at a time.

Learn more about Indigo Impacto at http://indigoimpacto.mx.

Develop Link makes Guatemalan healthcare more efficient

“Being able to leverage Agora’s well-known name within this community allowed us to successfully acquire funding.”

Catherine Flatley believes in unlocking the potential of existing healthcare systems to provide more efficient care for Latin Americans. She was first introduced to the world of healthcare as an intern for PricewaterhouseCoopers. Immersed in the industry, she became increasingly fascinated by the communications problems that existed in the developing world and the opportunities to fix them. But she wanted to know more about the problem.

Catherine spoke to over 300 doctors who had participated in mission trips around the world, and realized that many encountered the same difficulties arising from their inability to coordinate patient care. As a healthcare consultant, she had worked with several pharmaceutical firms who were interested in entering emerging markets but struggled with the lack of data necessary to expand.

She was blown away by the extent of the problem and motivated to solve it. A decisive resignation and move to Guatemala later, Develop Link was born.

As a referral platform for doctors in Latin America, Develop Link helps healthcare providers search for specialists and labs, share information, and consult each other. The data collected through the platform is subsequently organized and sold to pharmaceutical companies and insurance providers hoping to expand within the Latin American region. Catherine emphasizes that Develop Link is not trying to reinvent the wheel. It simply serves as the link bringing together all the existing institutions to facilitate more efficient care.

Wanting to improve her company’s potential for growth and scaling, Catherine participated in several Accelerators, including Points of Light CivicX, Impact Engine, and the Fellow Irish Social Hub. However, she lacked both direct access to the Latin American network and consulting that would instruct her specifically on the Latin American market. So she applied to Agora’s Accelerator.

Through the four-month program, Catherine refined her launch strategy, strengthened the value proposition she would deliver to pharmaceutical firm clients, and connected with invaluable investor networks. The SOCAP experience, facilitated by Agora, introduced her to her very first client in Mexico.

Since the Accelerator, Develop Link has steadily progressed, entering Mexico by virtue of demand and planning to enter Costa Rica. Catherine has recently closed two contracts with investors and is on her way to closing her third, motivated every day by the number of doctors, NGOs, government organizations, and private companies all trying to provide better healthcare in Latin America with a clear need to better communicate.

She believes that the ability to be flexible and adjust existing plans to new circumstances has been key to expanding her company, and hopes to continue working towards halting the Latin American ‘Brain Drain,’ in which talented and promising individuals leave their native country to pursue a professional career elsewhere. Her company’s potential for expansion and promise for physicians and patients everywhere keep talented employees like Shaili Zappa, her director for Guatemala, working locally.  Develop Link, run on teamwork and collaboration, is thus changing the world, one patient at a time.

Learn more about Develop Link at http://www.developlink.org.

There’s a Lot More to Coffee Than Beans

I set off with Luisa Lombera and Gates Gooding, the founders of a company named Pixán, (which means happiness, soul or essence in Maya), joining them in their quest to find the raw material that had thus far eluded them. Fresh from Agora Partnerships’ Entrepreneur Retreat held in Granada, Nicaragua, we were infused with an invigorated sense of purpose.

Gates and Luisa applied to the Agora Accelerator with the aim of turning Pixán into a flourishing business that will double the income of coffee farmers in the Pixán supply chain. Searching for an opportunity to create impact in the coffee sector in Latin America, they were inspired by the Yemeni traditional practice of making a drink called kishr (or qishr), which is a kind of chai made with coffee fruit, ginger, cardamom and cinnamon. Luisa and Gates took to the idea and are now looking to produce a beverage made with an infusion of dried coffee fruit, also known as “cáscara” (skin or peel – in Spanish).

Continue reading There’s a Lot More to Coffee Than Beans

Completing the Puzzle: how the Agora Accelerator helped PACE MD piece together a complicated business model

In Mexico, more than 3 million neonates die in their first month of life, almost 300,000 women from complications at birth, and more than 750,000 children die of diarrheal illness each year. And this is just the beginning. Haywood Hall, founder of PACE MD, discovered that a significant amount of these deaths can be averted with proper training. Mexico suffers from a “Medical Knowledge Gap” in which health care providers lack fundamental training and/or continuing medical education opportunities to provide consistent high quality care.

Continue reading Completing the Puzzle: how the Agora Accelerator helped PACE MD piece together a complicated business model

WANTED: High Potential Impact Entrepreneurs In Latin America

We are currently in search of 30 high-potential early-stage impact entrepreneurs from throughout Latin America to join our growing community of world-changing businesses (Agora’s Class of ’12 is pictured above).

Entrepreneurs around the world are joining a growing movement to create positive, sustainable impact through private enterprise. At Agora Partnerships, our mission is to accelerate those visionary entrepreneurs who are redefining the role of business in society.

We are in the middle of an ambitious recruitment effort for our 2013 Impact Accelerator. This highly selective program provides access to human, social, and financial capital for a unique community of entrepreneurs throughout Latin America. The Accelerator kicks off with an entrepreneur retreat in Central America, followed by strategy consulting and investment readiness services, and admittance to the Impact Investing in Action conference hosted in the United States.

Over the past two years, we have worked with 18 company operating in some of the poorest regions of the Western Hemisphere. Over 70% of or Class of ‘11 received millions of dollars in investment, propelling these impact companies to an average 80% growth rate.

Now, we are expanding from our base in Central America and searching for 30 new companies spanning the whole of Latin America to help accelerate impact for the region.

If you are an entrepreneur interested in applying to our Accelerator or if you’re interesting in helping us spread the word, please contact Inga Schulte-Bahrenberg at ischulte@agorapartnerships.org. You can find more information about how the Accelerator program worksformer entrepreneurs, a summary overview, and the results of our Accelerator on our website.

Furthermore, we’ve prepared ready-made Twitter, Facebook, and blog copy for you to share with your networks.

The deadline to be considered for scholarships is October 8. The final deadline for all applications is October 22. So, Click here to apply now!


Impact Investing in Action 2012 Wrap Up

Agora's Class of '12

Entrepreneurs, investors, field builders and thought leaders from around the impact investing world filed into Emory University’s Goizueta Business School on the morning of May 23. The previous night, a pair of receptions marked the beginning of Agora Partnerships’ (in conjunction with Village Capital) second annual impact investor conference – Impact Investing in Action.

All 106 attendees arrived with varying degrees of aspirations, desires and ambitions, though driven by the same belief that business can and should be used as an agent for positive social, economic, and environmental impact.

From Earth to the Moon

In total, 11 Agora entrepreneurs from Central America and Mexico traveled to Emory with the intent of impressing 16 investors representing 20 different firms.  The primary goal of the conference was to drive investment to these high-performing, high-growth impact entrepreneurs…..and the results?

Within 48 hours of the conference’s completion, 7 of our pitching entrepreneurs had already secured meetings with investors amounting to over $17 million in potential investments.

Agora entrepreneurs meet with potential investors following Impact Investing in Action.

The majority of the entrepreneurs hailed from Agora’s Class of  ’12 and represented a diversity of impact areas including traditional economic development, energy/environment, education/culture, technology/healthcare, and housing.

Over the course of the three-day conference, a range of panel discussions covering such topics as the “Story of a Deal,” the role of philanthropy in Impact Investing, coordinating capital for investment, industry challenges, and the importance of accelerators to the impact investing movement

The conference is the culmination of Agora’s Accelerator Program, an intensive 6-month program designed to give outstanding early-stage impact businesses poised for expansion access to the social, human, and financial capital needed to accelerate their growth.  The Accelerator Program includes workshops, seminars, strategic consulting, and mentoring in a variety of areas ranging from leadership to marketing to investor pitch development.

“The most beneficial thing I got out of the accelerator,” Maria Rodriquez of ByoEarth, a member of Agora’s Class of ‘12, stated, “was the strategic roadmap for my company’s scaling-up process.  Also, I received direct contact with investors that focus on the Central American region and an investment memorandum directed specifically to investors.”

Agora entrepreneurs from the Class of '12.

“The most beneficial factor of the Accelerator Program is the knowledge that the Agora team believes in me and my project,” Leonel Roman the founder of Class of ’12 company Wifinic stated. “They put their best effort into contacting the right investors for it. My company is a better company after going through the Accelerator Program. I am more confident in myself and have learned a lot from the team and from the other entrepreneurs. From Granada (the Entrepreneur Retreat) to Atlanta (the Investor Conference) was like from the Earth to the Moon.”

Investing. Connecting. Learning.

Impact Investing in Action attracted a range of investors from throughout the space including Calvert Funds, Good Capital, Halloran Philanthropies, RSF Social Finance, and Pomona Impact.

“We’re really here because of the success we had last year,” Rich Ambrose of Pomona Impact, an impact investing firm focused on Central America and Ecuador that funds social businesses ranging across all sectors, stated. Pomona invested in two members of the Agora Class of ‘11.

“We’re really here for three reasons,” Ambrose continues. “First, this is a great chance to see entrepreneurs pitch. There was such a high caliber from last year that we were really excited about getting the opportunity to see the entrepreneurs this year. Second, we were keen to meet other investors. This is a great opportunity to connect with others investing in this space. Third, it’s a great learning experience.”

“These companies have been through a rigorous selection process,” Daryn Dodson of the Calvert Fund stated about the pitching companies. “They have already developed materials that make what they do very easy to understand.”

“We love to see entrepreneurs who are passionate about solving a social problem in the world and haven gotten some traction in that pursuit,” Dodson continued. “At the end of the day, it’s critical to have a partner such as Agora that’s engaging in the governance and vetting of entrepreneurs in order to figure out what and where the exciting deals are and who is leading these enterprises that are looking to create positive impact in the world.”

Class of ‘13

Up next, recruitment efforts get underway for our Class of ’13 where we will be extending our reach beyond Central America and Mexico and working to accelerate impact companies throughout South America as well.

For now, the all-important due diligence process is just beginning among entrepreneurs in talks with investors. There’s still a long way to go to turn these initial conversations into concrete investments; however, the entrepreneurs are exiting the Accelerator equipped with the skills, tools, and resources necessary to scale their companies’ growth and, in turn, extend their impact.

“The conference projected Laudex to another level,” Francisco Cordero of Laudex, another Agora Class of ’12 company stated. “Within a few days we were part of a very interesting network of social impact investors and entrepreneurs. I think the best measure of success is how many connections were made throughout the conference, and from what I can tell, it will take us all a long way.”

7 of 9 Class of '13 companies are currently in talks with potential investors.